Millennials are treating their plants like children

    78
    Millennials are treating their plants like children

    Business is blooming. Millennials dig plants – as the wild tangle of fiddle-leaf figs and succulents that have sprouted all over Instagram has shown. And they’re willing to spend some green to create the most Pinterest-worthy plantscapes in their homes and offices. Natasha Sligh, 24, from Brooklyn just dropped $80 on a 4-inch rubber tree, a couple of colorful calatheas (a.k.a. prayer plants) and a philodendron, among other guilty-pleasure greenery. Her urban jungle of 13 plants includes a Monstera Deliciosa — a statement piece with its fan-shaped slitted leaves — a rubber tree and a succulent terrarium. “I’ve tried to make them more like pets and less like plants. They have names,” she said, such as Bruce, her favorite fiddle-leaf fig tree. “I’ve stuck some googly eyes on their pots. I like having something to take care of.” D.C.-area resident Maxine Mitchell, 29, picked up her gateway shrub – the Dieffenbachia “Camille” – five months ago to spruce up her pad. She’s already grown to 15 plant babies, including five neon pothos vines, a rubber plant, a spider plant and a monstera. “Originally, I wanted another way to decorate, but it’s also really nice having another living thing in my apartment,” she told Moneyish. “I don’t have any pets, and I live here by myself, so it’s nice to water them, and talk to them, and see how they’re doing.” Plus, she’s found that watering, pruning and checking for pests is an exercise in mindfulness. “It forces you to put your phone down and be present,” she said. Sling agreed. “It’s nice I have a little routine where I spend part of my Sunday mornings each week doing all the watering and fertilizing and rotating,” she said. “I put a record on and just focus.” These and other budding greenthumbs are at the root of the DIY yard and gardening industry hitting $36.9 billion, according to the 2017 National Garden Survey , which found that of the 6 million Americans who got into gardening in 2016, 5 million were between the ages of 18-to-34. Eliza Blank founded The Sill as an online plant delivery service six years ago. She’s since sprouted two brick-and-mortar stores and added potting demonstrations and gardening workshops. “People need to get into plants now more than ever,” she told Moneyish. “This is a tough time. And plants are something that you can nurture and have a mutually beneficial relationship with outside of the day-to-day grind. There’s comfort in that.” And we haven’t even hit peak plants yet. Indoor Garden Design director Ian Drummond told Horticulture Week that this year will be the “year of the houseplant,” with IKEA rolling out a new range of plants in August. Amazon recently rebranded its “Patio, Lawn & Garden” section into the Amazon Plants Store , curating bonsai, bamboo and succulent collections. And Paint Nite branched out from its happy hour painting parties to terrarium-making workshops with Plant Nite , where guests spend a few hours sipping drinks while […]