feature story

how much would you charge?

Florists from coast to coast share how they would price four basic arrangements.


by Kelsey E. Smith



 

Florists' Review frequently receives inquiries on how to price flower arrangements. Differences including

the cost of living, size of the city, overhead, supplier prices and more make the subject difficult to address,

so we asked eight retail florists, in

big cities and in small towns across

the country, to share how they would price four basic arrangements,

based on their suppliers' prices at

non holiday times. Here is what they said.

 

"Pricing in any flower shop will lead to its success or failure, and it is one area that is really overlooked in our industry. A high percentage of florists are not charging enough for their time, flowers or all of those little things that are often overlooked in arrangements."

 — Jennifer Kramer, co-owner

 Big Sky Floral & Design; Big Sky, Mont.

 

Our pricing Panel

1 Chico, Calif.

Population: 73,316

Median household income: $52,000

Touch of Class Florist

Sandra L. Molen, AIFD, AAF, PFCI, owner

Pricing strategy: 4-time markup for fresh flowers, 3-time markup for foliages and 2.5-time markup for hard goods. An additional "makeup charge" comprises labor and "essentials," which include wires, picks, etc. Labor is based on the amount of time spent on each design, accounting for a $42 hourly shop charge (70 cents per minute), rather than on a percentage of the overall cost. For example, arranging one dozen roses takes about 20 minutes, so the labor charge would be $14. Easel sprays and hand-tied bouquets each have a $25 minimum labor charge.

 

2   Fountain Valley, Calif.

Population: 55,857

Median household income: $61,700

The Flower Place, Inc.

Richard Seekins, AIFD, co-owner

Pricing strategy: 3-time markup for fresh product and 2.5-time markup for hard goods, plus 20 percent for design labor. Labor increases to 35 percent for sympathy designs and to 35 percent to 50 percent for wedding work, depending on the mechanics involved.

 

 

3 Big Sky, Mont.

Population: 1,221

Median household income: $58,400

Big Sky Floral & Design

Jennifer Kramer, co-owner

Pricing strategy: 3-time markup for fresh product and 2-time markup for hard goods, plus 20 percent labor on everyday designs, 25 percent labor on sympathy designs and 30 percent labor on wedding designs, to account for additional preparation time.

 

4 Pratt, Kan.

Population: 6,408

Median household income: $49,700

The Flower Shoppe

Lou Lynne Moss, AIFD, AAF, PFCI, owner

Pricing strategy: 3-time markup for fresh product and 2.5-time markup for hard goods, plus 20 percent for design labor, rounded to the closest marketable price. Labor increases to 30 percent for more detailed wedding work. (Note: This florist buys foliage in prepackaged bundles for greater value and a more varied assortment than standard bunches.)

 

5 Dallas, Texas

Population: 1,232,940

Median household income: $62,200

McShan Florist

Bruce McShan, owner

Pricing strategy: Each arrangement has a base price that includes hard goods and supplies, foliages, filler flowers and labor. All other flowers are priced by the stem, and the total is rounded to achieve a full-dollar price. The base price for a centerpiece is $7.50, an easel spray (including the easel stand) is $25 and a hand-tied bouquet is $15. One dozen roses arranged is always $75.

 

6 Janesville, Wis.

Population: 62,998

Median household income: $60,300

Floral Expressions, Inc.

Brad Harnisch, AIFD, owner

Pricing strategy: 3.5-time markup for fresh product and 2-time markup for hard goods, plus 20 percent for design labor, rounded to the nearest dollar or half dollar. Labor increases to 30 percent for wedding work.

 

7 Chicago, Ill.

Population: 2,833,321

Median household income: $69,800

Ashland Addison Florist Co.

Bill Sheffield, owner

Pricing strategy: 2.5- to 5-time markup for fresh product, which varies weekly to keep pricing competitive and fair (based on product, source and time of year), plus 10 percent for design labor.

 

8 New York, N.Y.

Population: 8,214,426

Median household income: $71,300

Irene Hayes Wadley & Smythe LeMoult

Dean Georges, owner

Pricing strategy: 4- to 5-time markup of all products. For sympathy and wedding designs, a 20 percent to 30 percent charge is added for design labor, based on amount of time spent.

 

9 Radford, Va.

Population: 14,525

Median household income: $55,300

Radford City Florist, Inc.

Jeff Corbin, AIFD, AAF, PFCI, owner

Pricing strategy: 3.5-time markup for fresh product and 2.5-time markup for hard goods, plus 20 percent for design labor, rounded up or down to hit a good price point. Labor increases to 35 percent for wedding work, to compensate for consultation and planning time.

 

10 Orlando, Fla.

Population: 220,186

Median household income: $54,900

In Bloom Florist

Len Morganseay,

AIFD, AAF,

Director of Floral Operations

Pricing strategy: 5-time markup on fresh product, which covers design labor, plus 3-time markup on hard goods. For wedding bouquets, the shop figures a 5-time markup on fresh product, plus the price of embellishments, then adds 40 percent to cover the presentation, including tissue and cellophane displayed in a standard box.

 

"For a florist operating with all the legitimate

overhead items in a large metro area, the days

of the three-time markup are long gone."

 

Dean Georges, owner

Irene Hayes Wadley & Smythe LeMoult; New York, N.Y.


 

centerpiece

 

MATERIALS

4 Asiatic lily blooms

10 hybrid tea roses

10 stems Phlox

8 stems larkspurs

3 branched stems spiral Eucalyptus

10 stems sword fern

4 stems leatherleaf fern

Low rectangular or oblong centerpiece bowl, plastic

Floral foam

Waterproof tape (to secure floral foam into bowl)

2 taper candles

2 taper candle holders, optional 

 


 

$153.50

Chico, Calif.

Touch of Class Florist

 

$150

Janesville, Wis.

Floral Expressions, Inc.

 

$135

New York, N.Y.

Irene Hayes Wadley & Smythe LeMoult

 

$135

Big Sky, Mont.

Big Sky Floral

 

$125

Dallas, Texas

McShan Florist

 

$120

Fountain Valley, Calif.

The Flower Place, Inc.

 

$119.95

Radford, Va.

(Note: Although this

arrangement would be

priced at $119.95 using

the pricing strategy

given on Page 67, the

florist would make

substitutions to accommodate

his clients' average budgets

without

compromising profit of the shop, where centerpieces typically are priced at $45 to $75.)

$99.95

Orlando, Fla.

In Bloom Florist

 

$94.95

Pratt, Kan.

The Flower Shoppe

 

$84.95

Chicago, Ill.

Ashland Addison Florist Co.

 

Additional arrangement samples are available in the November issue of Florists' Review.

(see below to subscribe)


You may contact Kelsey E. Smith by e-mail at ksmith@floristsreview.com or by phone at (800) 367-4708.


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