How to turn bodega flowers into beautiful bouquets

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How to turn bodega flowers into beautiful bouquets

Modal Trigger Denise Porcaro, aka Flower Girl NYC, in her studio. There’s a time and a place for bodega flowers,” Denise Porcaro, founder of Lower East Side floral studio Flower Girl NYC, tells The Post. Porcaro — who’s beloved by New York’s fashion set for her collaborations with French label Sézanne and her weekly home deliveries to the city’s flower-fond elite — says the blooms are great for quickie bouquets. “They won’t last a week like [well cared-for] market flowers,” but “for a last-minute dinner party,” they’re ideal. The Post nabbed her top tips and gave them a test run. Choose carefully You already know which bodega near you has the best egg-and-cheese — but do you know which one has the strongest flower game? To figure it out, “look for variety,” Porcaro recommends. “Is the storefront different every time you walk by? If so, that means they’re getting fresh flowers often, which is a good sign; it means the quality is likely better.” Once you find your floral hot spot, choose flowers with care. “Don’t just look at the top of the flower — flip them over to see how the stems are being treated,” Porcaro says. Make sure the coloring isn’t dull and that the stem tips are being hydrated somehow. Finally, keep your eyes peeled for seasonal blooms. “Lilacs are coming in now. Tulips, too,” Porcaro says. “Good bodegas may even have peonies.” Go on, fade away Modal Trigger Because of tulips’ distinctive shapes, they’re “a little harder to arrange with other flowers,” Porcaro says. So she likes to leave them on their own. “If you’re lucky enough to have a bodega with lots of colors of tulips, do an ombre look,” with tulips in a few different colors to create a color fade. The Post tried it out with sunset hues, poking the stems into floral foam ($7 at Michael’s) to help them stay upright. The result: spring-y success. One hue, three ways Modal Trigger Grouping same-color flowers is another no-brainer way to make a pretty statement, Porcaro says. “Say you do come across a beautiful bunch of lilacs at the bodega,” she adds. “You can do an all-purple arrangement, with purple roses and purple tulips. Put them in separate vases and run them down the center of a long table.” That same idea can be applied to any set of single-color fleurs — for example, the pink carnations ($4), roses ($10) and mums ($5), spied by The Post at a bodega and pictured below. When it comes to picking out a vase for your flowers, “don’t overthink it,” Porcaro says. “So many things can be a vase. You can do mason jars” — or even different-size drinking glasses. Whatever you do, keep it simple. Given their short lifespan, “less is more with bodega flowers,” Porcaro says. Still, they can “absolutely” be beautiful.