FLORISTS’ REVIEW is proud to present “The American Floral Trends Forecast 2018-2019,” the preeminent style report developed exclusively for the floral industry. This eighth edition of our biennial trends forecast debuted in our January 2018 issue, and you can also view it on our website at floristsreview.com/american-floral-trends-forecast-2018-2019. It’s also available for purchase at shop.floristsreview.com or by calling (800) 367-4708, ext. 512.

The four dominant trends identified for this year and next have many applications in floral design work, including daily designs, weddings and events, sympathy tributes, and even holiday designs. In this feature, we illustrate and explain the four trends, including their color palettes, the key flowers and coordinating elements, as they pertain to wedding and event work.

In addition to this “Wedding Applications” addendum, Keith and his team will share applications of these trends in other types of floral design work, including holiday designs in our July issue and parties and events in our October issue.

By interpreting “The American Floral Trends Forecast” through various types of floral design, we can update you on the latest evolutions in the trends. We want to make this report a living, breathing tool that assists you in navigating the changing landscape of floral design.

J. Keith White, AIFD, led our team of industry-leading trend consultants to develop this “Wedding Applications” expansion of “The American Floral Trends Forecast.” He then selected the floral designers featured below to contribute wedding bouquets and other floral compositions that illustrate their interpretations of the trends for weddings and events.

With a slight Asian influence, exemplified by a predominance of rich burgundy, red, magenta and fuchsia hues, supported by lively corals, deep greens, and even touches of complex marine and cerulean blues, the “Hanami” trend incorporates both bold and demure colors (tints, tones and shades of the specific hues), and its overall aesthetic is sophisticated, sumptuous and romantic – ideal for weddings. Key flowers include voluptuous multipetaled blooms, large and small, and other elements may include subtle layerings of metallic gold and champagne, “antique” appliqués and ribbons, and exquisite textural details.As with all of the “American Floral Trends,” all of the colors in the “Hanami” palette need not be included in a design to achieve the aesthetic, nor do all of the key flowers or supporting elements.

DESIGN MASTER COLORS Peony 550 (CMYK: 28, 100, 48, 13) / Carnation Red 716 (CMYK: 0, 100, 80, 20) Hunter Green 760 (CMYK: 93, 0, 82, 52) / Maroon 712 (CMYK: 57, 100, 67, 27) Coral 777 (CMYK: 0, 56, 42, 0) / Pacific Blue 690 (CMYK: 100, 30, 34, 2) 046

GOLD AND CHAMPAGNE – HUED METALLICS / JEWEL ACCENTS / VINTAGE HANDWORK / LUXURIOUS, SIMPLE RIBBONS AND FABRICS

Peonies (Paeonia)
Garden roses
Dahlias
Cushion Gerberas (e.g., Gerrondo, Pomponi)
Poppies (Papaver)
Persian buttercups (Ranunculus)
Pincushion flowers (Scabiosa)
Red-hued foliages

Kate™ (Auschris) garden roses by David Austin.
Rich magenta-pink blooms of old style beauty.
Strong, fresh fragrance.
Photo by David Austin

Design by Kiana Underwood Photo by Corbin Gurkin Photo by David Austin

Melodically romantic, the “Crescendo” trend touches both the low and high notes of a color palette dominated by soft gray-lavender and blush. Befitting it’s name, this trend’s hues gradually increase in intensity, particularly when the soft lavender and blush are infused with more intense subordinating hues, such as a blush that transitions ever so slightly to peach or coral, more vivid raspberry and rose pinks, stronger red-violets, herbal and grayed greens, and even pops of robin’s egg blue. For weddings, this trend palette is ideal for complementing bridesmaids dresses in soft green-infused blue hues. With a hint of vintage that dances with nature, organic and loose styling plays with watercolor ribbons and, when appropriate, the layering of antique gold with rose gold, bringing this trend into a natural harmony.

Design and photo by Lori McNorton, Florists’ Review

DESIGN MASTER COLORS Blush 781 (CMYK: 0, 12, 5, 0) / Hyacinth 762 (CMYK: 33, 35, 0, 0) Basil 676 (CMYK: 40, 0, 86, 43) / Robin’s Egg 792 (CMYK: 44, 0, 18, 0) Raspberry 766 (CMYK: 0, 98, 0, 5) / Beach 559 (CMYK: 2, 3, 13, 0) 048

A BLEND OF ROSE GOLD AND ANTIQUE GOLD / WATERCOLOR RIBBONS / ROBIN’S EGG FINISHES AND FABRICS / GRADATIONS OF TEXTURES

‘Big Star’ Eucalyptus
Photo courtesy of Resendiz Brothers Protea Growers

Keira™ (Ausboxer) garden roses by David Austin.
Natural, vintage-style ruffled blooms in a variend blend of pink, peach and cream. Medium myrrh scent.
Photo by David Austin

Eucalyptus, all species and varieties
Lavender and blush-colored roses
Garden roses
Peonies (Paeonia)
Zinnias
Persian buttercups (Ranunculus)
Windflowers (Anemone)

Design by Kiana Underwood
Photo by Emily Scott

The “Kaleidoscope” aesthetic comprises influences of 1950s form and line as well as 1960s pop-art and hippie movements – a modern “anything goes” vibe. The bold, vibrant color palette comprises essentially two complementary harmonies, led by combinations of deep complex blues and greens – most notably yellow-greens – and often contrasted with vivacious tangerine and fuchsia. In it purest interpretation, this trend is void of yellows and violets – otherwise, it would be another version of a polychromatic color scheme.Floral styling can range from tailored to wild and free-form, but prevalent in all styles is an underlying earthy naturalness. Modern interpretations of classic geometric patterns and mosaics also can play a role in this trend, as can textural yarns and wools.

DESIGN MASTER COLORS Lake 556 (CMYK: 100, 50, 10, 62) / Sprout 554 (CMYK: 41, 9, 100, 3) Spring Green 753 (CMYK: 70, 4, 90, 0) / Teal Blue 742 (CMYK: 100, 12, 27, 24) Fuchsia 786 (CMYK: 22, 95, 0, 0) / Tangerine 776 (CMYK: 0, 78, 80, 0)

Design by Tobey Nelson
Photo by Heather Mayer Photographers

Design by Corinne Sebesta Sisti
Photo by Danfredo Photos + Films

Green Cymbidium orchid bouquet
Photo by flowerpicturegallery.com

CLASSIC UPDATED MOTIFS AND PATTERNS / TEXTURAL YARNS AND WOOLS /
ARTISTIC RETRO CUES

Succulents Air plants (Tillandsia)
Hybrid Delphinium
Hybrid Dianthus barbatus (e.g., ‘Green Trick’, ‘Green Ball’)
Green Cymbidium orchids
Thoroughwax (Bupleurum)
Marigolds (Tagetes)
Pincushions (Leucospermum)
Hybrid buttercups (Ranunculus)
Tulips (Tulipa)
Stocks (Matthiola)
Roses, hybrid tea, garden and spray

Design by Françoise Weeks
Photo by Lauren Brooks Photography

Drawing upon the simplicity of going “back to one’s roots,” the modern farmhouse, with its reclaimed wood, aged vessels, and handcrafted elements of woven yarns and hand-forged iron exemplifies the “Wildroot” aesthetic. For weddings, this means a countrified feeling – either casually formal or upscaled rustic – with lush botanicals from grandma’s garden accented with “field-grown flowers,” grasses, berries, branches, and gray-toned foliages including Eucalyptus, dusty miller and the like.

The color palette comprises two trios of colors, either of which can be dominant or subordinate. The softer side of “Wildroot” is composed of lavender, gray flannel and mist, and the brighter combination includes radish red, salmon and ochre. When one trio of hues is chosen as the prominent palette, the other trio accents it. And again, not all colors in either trio need be used to achieve the look.

Design by Tobey Nelson
Photo by Suzanne Rothmeyer Photography

DESIGN MASTER COLORS Lavender 708 (CMYK: 29, 54, 0, 0) / Gray Flannel 798 (CMYK: 13, 4, 4, 57) Mist 555 (CMYK: 25, 10, 16, 0) / Radish 551 (CMYK: 30, 100, 80, 8) Salmon 552 (CMYK: 6, 82, 69, 9) / Light Ochre 553 (CMYK: 13, 19, 68, 0)

Design by Corinne Sebesta Sisti
Photo by The Markows Photography

GRAY-TONED, GRAY-WASHED ANYTHING / AGED METALS / RAW FABRICS LIKE JUTE AND MUSLIN / HANDCRAFTED ITEMS / RECLAIMED WOOD

Design by Tobey Nelson
Photo by Suzanne Rothmeyer Photography

Beatrice™ (Auslevity) garden roses by David Austin.
A large, ruffled rosette filled with butter yellow petals.
Strong fragrance of myrrh with hints of fruit and almond.
Photo by David Austin

Protea
Banksia
Conebush (Leucadendron)
Garden rose ‘Quatre Coeurs’
“Garden” flowers
“Field-grown” flowers / “Wildflowers”
Accent/“filler” flowers
Ornamental grasses
Berries / Berried branches
Gray-toned foliage (e.g., Eucalyptus, dusty miller)

Photo courtesy of Resendiz Brothers Protea Growers